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Vomiting or Diarrhea

There are many causes of vomiting in our pets. Initially, if your pet does vomit, withhold food and water for several hours. NO milk. NOTHING TO EAT OR DRINK.

woman feeding cat
woman feeding cat

Vomiting

There are many causes of vomiting in our pets. Initially, if your pet does vomit, withhold food and water for several hours. NO milk. NOTHING TO EAT OR DRINK.

If the vomiting resolves and they are acting well, then this may be all that is needed. Continued vomiting for more than 6-8 hours can indicate a more serious issue. At this time, we would recommend having your pet checked by our veterinarian. Prolonged vomiting may be due to a foreign body ingestion (socks, bones, rocks, mulch, etc.) You name it, and a dog will possibly eat it. Garbage ingestion, recent diet changes, table foods are also common triggers of vomiting.

In cats, eating objects like plants, sewing thread/strings, etc. can cause vomiting. The list goes on and on. The bottom line is if vomiting continues after several hours; you know your pet ate something it should not have; there is lethargy, loss of appetite, or other signs of illness, it’s time to have them examined.

Our veterinarians will discuss their history and do a physical exam of your pet. Treatments for vomiting vary. Some patients with mild vomiting and no other illness signs may initially be treated with medications and sent home. In more severe cases, additional diagnostics and hospitalization are required.

Diarrhea

Diarrhea is much more common in dogs than in cats. If your dog or cat has diarrhea (soft watery feces) and it goes away in 8-12 hours, then it may have been mild gastrointestinal issues that have resolved. If there is no vomiting, then keep your pet on their regular dog food diet: NO TABLE FOODS. NO MILK.

If diarrhea continues and there is vomiting, or you notice blood in the feces, then it is time to have your pet examined. There is a long list of possible causes of diarrhea in dogs and cats. Have they been fully vaccinated, how old are they, what is there diet, did they eat something they should not have, are they on heartworm preventative. These are just a few of the questions our veterinarians will ask you. If our pets could only tell us what they may have ingested or how they feel, this would help greatly.

Following the examination by our veterinarian, you will both discuss the possible causes and together decide on a treatment plan which is best for your pet. Some cases of diarrhea can be treated with medications, and the patient sent home. Other patients have much more severe conditions, which may require additional diagnostics and hospitalization.

Our veterinarians will discuss their history and do a physical exam of your pet. Treatments for diarrhea vary. Some patients with mild diarrhea and no other signs of illness may initially be treated with medications and sent home. In more serious cases, additional diagnostics and hospitalization are required.